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>  forums  >  Photography techniques  >  Shooting glass plates
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Chris Macnamara 
Shooting glass plates
22 Aug 2007 at 14:37 GMT
number of posts: 22
member since: 23 Aug 06
location: uk

status: offline
I've been asked to shoot glass plates and sculpture by a local artist. They are going to be used on her website. I've never photographed glass before, and I expect it's gonna be tricky.

I'm thinking potentially a polarizing filter to reduce reflections. I want to ba able to show the transparency and opacity of different parts of the glass, so do I shoot in a natural environment, or a studio arrangement, with a fixed background? All very confusing!

Anyone got experience of this kind of thing, please, and wish to help a fellow SCer??

Thanks in advance


Chris
DrAW! 
re: Shooting glass plates
10 Sep 2007 at 20:10 GMT
number of posts: 37
member since: 8 Sep 07
location: us

status: offline
shame no one replied you
it's probably too late now but...
polarising won't hurt
no direct flashes at the glass (whichever set up you use) cos angle of incidence equals angle of reflection
if you really wanna show transparency then the light behind the glass should be more than that in front of it (yeah you may wanna try throwing some light (literally) on whatever is behind the glass in a way that won't disturb your photography...ie no lights coming directly at the camera)
that's the little i can contribute for now
hope it's useful
DrAW! 
re: Shooting glass plates
10 Sep 2007 at 20:22 GMT
number of posts: 37
member since: 8 Sep 07
location: us

status: offline
and as much as possible...especially since artwork on the glass your camera should be pointed directly at the glass (camera, not your flash or lighting) so as to avoid distortion
DrAW! 
re: Shooting glass plates
10 Sep 2007 at 20:25 GMT
number of posts: 37
member since: 8 Sep 07
location: us

status: offline
by directly i meant at angle 90 degrees to the plane of the glass
 
re: Shooting glass plates
11 Jan 2008 at 17:40 GMT
number of posts: 1
member since:
location:

status: offline
Don't light the glass at all! Use a white background and light that, don't point light directly at the glass or you will get reflections (and the edges of the glass will dissapear.) By lighting the background you will get the glass illuminated but the edges will be defined.


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