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>  forums  >  Photography techniques  >  Where's the sun?
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The Maven  [admin] 
Where's the sun?
30 Jun 2006 at 17:31 GMT
number of posts: 330
member since: 13 Jan 06
location: uk

status: offline
Just thought I'd share this tip with you guys. Ever gone out shooting on a sunny day and come back with blown out white skies and dull colours? Then this trick is for you.

It's very simple. Just take care about where the position of the sun is. Always make sure it's to your back. If you take a photo in the direction of the sun, of course the sky's gonna be blown out. It's just too bright for the camera to capture the scene. One the other hand, if the sun is to your back, you're gonna get nice blue skies.

Also, having the sun to your back means that the side of your subject facing you will be well lit up. No more dark faces etc.

Hope this helps. If it's worked for you, do share your experience here.
Matt Frederiksen 
re: Where's the sun?
1 Jul 2006 at 00:29 GMT
number of posts: 10
member since: 30 May 06
location: us

status: offline
That has been my experience too. And I love the blue skies. Blown out skies are almost impossible to rescue too.
Denosha 
re: Where's the sun?
1 Jul 2006 at 09:21 GMT
number of posts: 5
member since: 16 Jan 06
location: sg

status: offline
This is where grad ND filters come in. They can really work wonders!
TheDailySunrise.com 
re: Where's the sun?
1 Jul 2006 at 16:22 GMT
number of posts: 23
member since: 23 Jun 06
location: India

status: offline
True,
Or an HDR shot would be cool if thou is carrying a tripod, also, taking the sun out of the frame as you said.
Guest 
re: Where's the sun?
8 Jul 2006 at 12:51 GMT
number of posts: 18620
member since: unknown
location: unknown

status: offline
3 little letters...HDR
sk 
re: Where's the sun?
12 Jul 2006 at 13:10 GMT
number of posts: 6
member since: 14 Feb 06
location: uk

status: offline
If u must shoot a subject against a sunny sky, u can always under-expose the sky and use a fill in flash to light up the subject
BeakerSt 
re: Where
17 Jul 2006 at 12:40 GMT
number of posts: 107
member since: 10 Feb 06
location: uk

status: offline
You only need a tripod if you are shooting multiple exposures. If you have the RAW facility you can take a single image and create alternative exposure setting images later in the software. I don't always carry a tripod with me.

post replying to 's post:

>  True,
Or an HDR shot would be cool if thou is carrying a tripod, also, taking the sun out of the frame as you said.


 
re: Where
1 Aug 2006 at 23:35 GMT
number of posts: 6
member since:
location:

status: offline
You can't make a genuine HDR image from the same RAW file processed at diferent parameters.
To create a HDR file you need more information than the sensor is capable of capturing. Therefore you need at least two exposures one for the highlights and one for the shadows; and preferably three.
The "exposure" settings in a RAW processor just alter the curves, changing where the mid tone is set. You can only record more or less light by using the settings on your camera.
You can process two images from one RAW file and then place on on a layer above the other and blend them, but this dosen't creat a file with any greater range than the original image possesed. However it will usually work for skys as long as you don't blow too many of the highlights.
The Maven  [admin] 
re: Where
2 Aug 2006 at 07:23 GMT
number of posts: 330
member since: 13 Jan 06
location: uk

status: offline
A RAW file contains about 1-2 stops more dynamic range than a JPEG (which discards some highlight and shadow detail to save space). So you can't get a proper HDR, but with the right processing you can get a little bit of improvement over JPEG straight out of the camera.
 
re: Where
2 Aug 2006 at 22:29 GMT
number of posts: 7
member since:
location:

status: offline
...the other possibility if your subject is reasonably close and not too big you can use fill-in flash to reduce contribution to the overall exposure from the sun/sky. I took a series of wedding photos recently against a dramatic cloudscape that was completely blown out with flash but was close to perfectly exposed with fill-in flash.
Tone
Guest 
re: Where
15 Mar 2018 at 05:49 GMT
number of posts: 18620
member since: unknown
location: unknown

status: offline
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re: Where
5 Apr 2018 at 08:43 GMT
number of posts: 1
member since: 5 Apr 18
location: United Kingdom

status: offline
I'll be back again, thanks for the info.

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